12

From the FAQ: Yes! Stack Exchange has always explicitly encouraged users to answer their own questions. If you have a question that you already know the answer to, and you would like to document that knowledge in public so that others (including yourself) can find it later, it's perfectly okay to ask and answer your own question on a Stack Exchange site. ...


8

Mass deletion of posts is something that will generally get you suspended. That being said, the SEDE (Stack Exchange Data Explorer) is the place to go if you want assistance in crafting such a query so you can study your acceptance rate and your scoring / ability to get the "check" which are all excellent and fine goals to have. http://data.stackexchange....


7

It's interesting that you ask this question, as this is one of the problems that exist with forums that SE was designed from the very beginning to mitigate against. The correct thing to do is simply to post another answer. People visiting the question needing an answer are likely to read all the answers anyway, including the up-to-date answer. In cases ...


7

Two things work very well. 1) Edit the question to remain historically significant - answer at time. You can edit the answer if needed or just comment that this is no longer true. 1a) If the basic need is still there, re-ask the new question and link the two explaining how the old question isn't the answer since X, Y, and Z have changed. 2) Edit / comment ...


6

"Accepted" basically means that the asker was happy with the answer (which doesn't necessarily mean it's correct). Usually votes are a better indicator on answer quality/correctness because more eyeballs are involved. So if you run into such a situation you can downvote wrong answers (even if they are accepted) upvote correct answers (or provide the correct ...


5

Nothing can be done, although you can downvote the answer (and either answer with the correct answer, providing some reference to the accepted answer, or comment underneath the accepted answer). Mods cannot override, remove, or nominate accepted answers, only the OP can do that.


4

Only the user asking the question can accept one of the answers. Once the user decided to delete his/her account, there is no other way to answer acceptance. The same actually happens if the asker just looses interest and never comes back to the site. See Moderators accepting answers on user's behalf after a certain time period to understand why even ...


4

Short answer, no. You would need to ask for this change on the main stack exchange meta to change the code across the entire site. Long answer - people voting for useful answers gives 10 rep to the people so the +5 for the tick mark is a little like a cherry on top of the sundae. Voting, putting a bounty on a really great answer are much more meaningful to ...


2

That's a tough one, I think that the only way to be safe from this happening too much is to limit or proviso your answers in some way. "As of today..." or "At the current version 4 of X..." Things always change. What is not possible today may well be added tomorrow. I would correct your answer noting that it was right at the time of going to press, as it ...


2

Ideally, two things happen to abandoned questions. Abandonment happens when the user never comes back or in a more permanent manner when the user account becomes deleted. At that point, the text still belongs to the community - so there's nothing preventing someone from re-asking the same question and explaining why having a check mark is important to the ...


1

I would ask another question referring to the original for Lion but in the new question state what OS you need it for (in this case cheat and ask for the first one you know it works on) The questions and answers are still useful as there are still people on Lion and Snow Leopard so the answers are not wrong. We would now be helping more people. On some ...


1

I would say that if your question and the posted answer remain accurate for some context, but not the latest context, keep it as the accepted answer, and edit the question to indicate the limited context. For instance, if you asked "Can I run apps so they take up the full screen" under Leopard, the answer, in general was "No, there is no generic full-screen ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible